Advocacy

Notes from Liverpool
Liverpool, UK July 2019.

In 2010 Liverpool's Pier Head and Canal Link won the prestigious RIBA Public Space Award. From 2006 to 2009, as a young landscape architect, Erika was dedicated to the implementation of this project. Ten years later, she made a trip to Liverpool and saw a familiar place in a new light. +

Embracing forgotten shorelines
Redwood City, May 2019.

Many cities in California and around the world are re-orienting their urban fabric to embrace not only their forgotten shorelines, but also their forgotten natural and human histories. We joined Redwood City stakeholders to explore how culture and design can help re-connect. Embracing forgotten shorelines is the last of a 3-part speaker series organized by Redwood City's Parks and Arts Foundation.

Latinxs and the environment
Berkeley, April, 2019.

We joined academics, policymakers and community organizations to discuss the intersection of climate change, urban planning, environmental justice, health and environment. Latinxs and the Environment is a University of California, Berkeley initiative led by the Center of Latinx Policy Research and the College of Natural Resources.


The future of public outreach in Mexico
Published in Animal Político, March, 2019.

Our recent column published in Animal Politico, discusses public outreach processes in the context of a political renaissance taking place in Mexico. We discuss the implementation of large infrastructure projects that have resulted in a legacy of environmental and social pressures felt most deeply by the communities where the projects are implemented, while the benefits are enjoyed afar. An environmental justice lens applied to public outreach processes would support a bottom-up approach, strengthening communities from within, building local capacity, and creating platforms to analyze and solve complex problems.

Read full article in animalpolitico.com

Making the invisible visible
San Francisco reimagines water and resource recovery

If, to quote Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, "what is essential is invisible to the eye", water infrastructure projects will need to harness architecture, art, and education to strengthen the civic partnerships that will make these essential projects possible and attain a new kind of visibility that embodies cultural meaning and inspiration.

Making the invisible visible narrates the journey of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission as they embark on a once in a generation opportunity to transform San Francisco's largest wastewater treatment plant into a 21st Century Resource Recovery Campus. Speaking at WEFTEC 2017 in Chicago, we explore how the alignment of city-wide environmental goals and local community aspirations can render infrastructure investment as a cultural and social process beyond its technical boundaries.

Water Environment Federation National Conference (WEFTEC)
Chicago, 2017. Conference abstract.